Chúc Khách một ngày vui vẻ và thành công trong công việc| Hôm nay là "18-05-24 " rồi nhé| RSS| THOÁT 
          
CHƯA CÓ BÀI MỚI TUẦN NÀY NHÉ!

500



 ÔN THI TN THPT 2017
 TRANG WEB LIÊN KẾT
ÔN TẬP HỌC  KỲ 1 

ĐĂNG NHẬP
Đăng nhập:
Mật khẩu:
 
 RÈN LUYỆN KỸ NĂNG
MỖI NGÀY NÊN HỌC 

TIN TỨC & SỰ KIỆN
WEBSITE NỔI BẬT 

QUIZLET







CẢNH ĐẸP VIỆT NAM

THỐNG KÊ TRUY CẬP

Trực tuyến 1
khách quí 1
Thành viên 0

Thành viên
 
MẸO VẶT NGỮ PHÁP TIẾNG ANH [3]

PHRASES & CLAUSES IN ENGLISH [3]
OTHER GRAMMAR POINTS [25]PARTS OF SPEECH [1]

SENTENCE STRUCTURES [1]NGỮ PHÁP QUA TRUYỆN CƯỜI [11]
FINITE VERB [7]

NON-FINITE VERB [1]

« 1 2 3 4 ... 10 11 »

-An absolute phrase is a modifier (quite often a participle), or a modifier and a few other words, that attaches to a sentence or a noun, with no conjunction. An absolute phrase cannot contain a finite verb.

-Absolute phrases usually consist of a noun and a modifier that modifies this noun, NOT another noun in the sentence.

-Absolute phrases are optional in sentences, i.e., they can be removed without damaging the grammatical integrity of the sentence. Since absolute phrases are optional in the sentence, they are often set off from the sentence with commas or, less often, with dashes. We normally explain absolute phrases by saying that they modify entire sentences, rather than one word. This is an important concept, since many similar phrases that we work with modify other words. For example, adjectives modify nouns, and adverbs can modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. That said, however, in some cases, it seems to make more sense to say that absolute phrases modify nouns. We will look at some of these examples .

... Đọc thêm

Category: PHRASES & CLAUSES IN ENGLISH | Views: 638 | Added by: dangthanhtam | Date: 21-06-14

Most adjectives can go in two main places in a sentence: in attributive position and predicative position.

In attributive position, an adjective comes before the noun it modifies.

  • She is a nice girl.
  • She married a rich businessman.

In predicative position, an adjective goes after the verb.

Category: PARTS OF SPEECH | Views: 564 | Added by: dangthanhtam | Date: 12-06-14

HARDLY / SCARCELY / BARELY ... WHEN
NO SOONER ... THAN

When a story is told in the past tense, the adverbials hardly, scarcely, barely and no sooner are often used to emphasise that one event quickly followed another. The verb describing the earlier event is usually in the past perfect tense. If hardly, scarcely, barely and no sooner are in the initial position, the subject and auxiliary are inverted:

Hardly had I arrived h ... Đọc thêm
Category: OTHER GRAMMAR POINTS | Views: 676 | Added by: dangthanhtam | Date: 14-05-14

 

Would rather, would prefer, prefer

to use ... Đọc thêm

Category: OTHER GRAMMAR POINTS | Views: 557 | Added by: dangthanhtam | Date: 13-04-14

Another can mean 'one more of the same kind'. It is used with singularcountable nouns.

  • We need another person to finish the work. (= We need one more person to finish the work.)
  • He has bought another car.
  • Could I have another cup of coffee?

With uncountable and  ... Đọc thêm

Category: OTHER GRAMMAR POINTS | Views: 542 | Added by: dangthanhtam | Date: 11-04-14

TRANG THÔNG TIN ĐIỆN TỬ TIẾNG ANH -THẦY ĐẶNG THANH TÂM- THPT CHU VĂN AN-AN GIANG
Address: Phu My Town- Phu Tan District- An Giang Province -Vietnam
All Rights Reserved

We welcome feedback and comments at E-mail: tamlinhtoanbao@gmail.com 
Best viewed in Spread Firefox Affiliate Button with at least a 1024 x 768 screen resolution.

  vé máy bay    Listening